Steve Harwell (Photo: Jeff Kravitz/Getty Images), Mark McGrath (Photo: Sam Levi/Getty Images), and Fred Durst (Photo: Markus Cuff/Getty Images). Graphic: Natalie Peeples. (Photo: Leon Neal/Getty Images) Photo: Getty Images Photo: A24 In the grubby, squirrelly, one-crazy-night New York crime drama Good Time , Robert Pattinson disappears under a ratty haircut, a mangy beard, and a thick glaze of animal desperation. His character, a petty crook named Connie Nikas, spends almost every second on screen running into or out of trouble, and the star wears that frazzled frenzy—that state of constant back-against-the-wall anxiety—like another layer of his baggy wardrobe. What we’re seeing, in the mad scramble of this outlaw dirtbag, is a career transformation. Stripping away almost all traces of movie-star glamour to reveal the naked, nervy talent underneath, Pattinson finally bursts out of the chrysalis of his pin-up boy celebrity. The metamorphosis from YA heartthrob into electrifying character actor is complete. Like his one-time co-star Kristen Stewart, Pattinson has been course-correcting away from Twilight for years—allowing David Cronenberg to twist his star power into strange new shapes , logging eccentric supporting performances in films like The Rover and James Gray’s The Lost City Of Z . But Good Time […]