Killers of the Flower Moon

From the critics Killers of the Flower Moon is a gripping tale, masterfully told. When murderers escape justice, Grann notes, “history can often provide at least some final accounting.” While it’s too late to identify, let alone punish, all those who preyed on the Osage, this ensures these brutal crimes will never again be forgotten. Full Review In the 1870s, the Osage Indians were herded onto a small tract of land in Oklahoma-land that unexpectedly held vast reserves of oil, rendering the tribe incredibly rich overnight. By law, the Osage had mineral rights outright, although they were still treated like children, requiring a white "guardian" to manage their assets. In 1921, there was a sudden upsurge in deaths of the Osage on the reservation-accidents, bad whiskey, and outright murder. Grann (The Lost City of Z) writes of these crimes, where at least 18 Osage and three nontribe members met suspicious deaths by 1925, many of them members of the same family. The Osage pleaded for the federal government to help, and J. Edgar Hoover, head of the fledgling FBI, sent agent Tom White to investigate. White discovered that many of the victims were connected to a single […]

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