The physicist Richard Feynman once wrote of the universe’s vastness: “It does not do harm to the mystery to know a little about it. For far more marvelous is the truth than any artists of the past imagined!” In his new book, “Why? What Makes Us Curious,” the astrophysicist and best-selling author Mario Livio writes about Feynman and other historical figures who have exhibited great and varied interest in the world around them. He also investigates the different shapes curiosity can take, how it expresses itself and the regions of the brain in which it appears to reside. Below, Livio talks about the latest research about the subject, how the book changed as he wrote it, Albert Einstein and Leonardo da Vinci, and more. When did you first get the idea to write this book? I was always a very curious person, and I wondered about the mechanisms of curiosity for a long time. But I wasn’t sure whether I could write a book about this, because psychology and neuroscience are not my fields of expertise. Then about five years ago, I was invited to give a TedxMidAtlantic talk , and they allowed me to choose the topic. So […]