Are you afraid that your love of grammar makes you a square? Don’t worry, but do pick one: A. Your love of grammar has nothing to do with your being a square. B. Your love of grammar has nothing to do with you being a square. Which one did you pick, " your being a square" or " you being a square"? Or did they both seem fine? It’s OK, we love you no matter what, and we’re going to tell you everything you need to know about both options. (We should also note that we here at Merriam-Webster think grammar-loving squares are about the coolest cats around. <3) There is little difference in meaning between "your being a square" and "you being a square," but a surprising difference in the grammatical structure of the sentence. The difference between " your being a square" and " you being a square" is, of course, that the pronoun is the possessive pronoun your in one and the personal pronoun you in the other. Other than that, though, the sentences basically mean the same thing, which is strange. These kinds of pronouns aren’t typically interchangeable; "That black beret is hers" doesn’t mean […]